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Discarded trash speaks to the masses at the Claremont Museum of Art

William Moreno, the executive director of the Claremont Museum of Art, joins Curator Pilar Tompkins and Angel Villanueva in front of a new exhibition in the museum, “The Ten Pound Ape.” The artwork is constructed from urban debris and littered with throwaways from communities intended to create an interactive and thought-provoking piece of art. / photo by Christopher Guzman

William Moreno, the executive director of the Claremont Museum of Art, joins Curator Pilar Tompkins and Angel Villanueva in front of a new exhibition in the museum, “The Ten Pound Ape.” The artwork is constructed from urban debris and littered with throwaways from communities intended to create an interactive and thought-provoking piece of art. / photo by Christopher Guzman

Michael Escañuelas
Staff Writer

A dynamic clash of art styles was staged at the Claremont Museum of Art with a dual exhibit Saturday.

The exhibits were separated into two divisions throughout the museum, projecting different aesthetic experiences.

The first project was by a group named Ten Pound Ape titled, “Your Mother was Beautiful Once, part vier.”

The project is the fourth addition in a series of ventures that takes ephemeral items and transforms them into interactive pieces.

The piece was large decorated with plenty of colors, bright signs and interactive aspects.

The second exhibit titled, “An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection,” was a collection of works that chronicle the past two years since the museum’s opening.

Each piece of art was donated to the museum by local artists, and stood as silent but modest portions in the two exhibits.

Allowing viewers to get away from the chaos of the “Ten Pound Ape” exhibit, a secluded gallery posed as a place to gather around and discuss the various art pieces.

“It’s a simple premise,” said the Claremont Museum of Art’s executive director, William Moreno. “I’m trying to bring together the younger group and the older group with this exhibit.”

The “Ten Pound Ape” exhibit was the first piece on display upon entering the museum.

The project, which was brought together in only a week under the direction of artist Matt Wardell, was a collection of trash assembled from neighboring cities.

“It’s a dynamic exhibit, it compliments the things we forgot,” said Patti Richardson, a volunteer at the event.

The piece was set in three different displays; tall standing boards stood forming a square, covered in papers that were collected from the streets. Flyers reading, “Missing,” and “Tutors Wanted,” styrofoam pieces, pictures, random paintings, and even shoes are just some of the examples that decorated the walls of each of the three displays.

Two of the sections were closed off with volunteers hiding behind peek holes, slipping small pieces of paper with messages in Spanish and English while also throwing peanuts at spectators.

The third section was built after a traditional gallery allowing individuals to wander through and observe.

Inside the display was a couch, a desk, and various items with papers that were similar to the other displays.

Music played at all three sections and inside the third display was a record player with an assortment of old records for viewers to choose and play.

“It’s cool how he put that together,” said Jessica Agustio, 20, a student at Chaffey College.

The second exhibit served as an interesting juxtaposition to the “Ten Pound Ape” exhibit and caught many of the viewers attention.

“It really makes you feel like a kid again,” said Michael Coronado, 20, a student at Chaffey College.

Michael Escañuelas can be reached at michael.escanuelas@laverne.edu.

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