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Granquist details injury rehab

Megan Granquist, assistant professor of movement and sports science, presented a lecture on athletic training and rehabilitation in the President’s Dining Room on Monday. Granquist’s topic was rehabilitation adherence and the measurement scale for an athlete’s ability and desire to respond to physical rehabilitation after an injury.  / photo by Christopher Guzman

Megan Granquist, assistant professor of movement and sports science, presented a lecture on athletic training and rehabilitation in the President’s Dining Room on Monday. Granquist’s topic was rehabilitation adherence and the measurement scale for an athlete’s ability and desire to respond to physical rehabilitation after an injury. / photo by Christopher Guzman

The ‘will to heal’ is addressed in the faculty lecture.

Aisha Gonzales
Staff Writer

Megan Granquist, assistant professor of movement and sports science, shared her research on sports injury rehabilitation adherence to a group of students and faculty Monday in the President’s Dining Room.

Granquist’s lecture, “Rehabilitation Adherence Measure for Athletic Training,” drew from her doctoral dissertation, where she sought to discover evidence indicating that rehabilitation adherence played an important role in accomplishing favorable athletic outcomes.

Adherence in sports injury rehabilitation is defined as the athlete’s active involvement and behaviors that agree with the recommendations of the athletic trainer for a positive healing result.

“We need to know how to measure adherence and the outcomes,” Granquist said. “Once we understand how adherence affects outcomes, we will know how to better enhance rehabilitation.”

Her research was intended to identify indicators for sports injury rehabilitation adherence in connection to collegiate athletic training and to construct a rehabilitation adherence measure for athletic trainers in regards to these indicators.

“I wanted to investigate it more because I did not see research there,” Granquist said. “I felt that the studies were not measuring adherence accurately.”

RAdMAT incorporated three different steps: Item generation, expert review and an athletic trainer survey.

Seven collegiate certified athletic trainers researched the indicators of sport injury rehabilitation adherence that should be included in the measure.

Granquist then presented the findings to experts in sports injury rehabilitation for feedback on content and clarity.

Granquist used their responses to present an updated measure for additional athletic trainers. Her final feedback led to a 16-item RAdMAT which emphasized categories of behaviors such as attendance, participation, communication, attitude and effort.

“Now my personal and professional goals are to educate athletic trainers on the psychology of rehabilitation,” Granquist said.

She hoped the development of the RAdMAT would assist athletic trainers in adequately rating behaviors of athletes in a collegiate setting.

Granquist emphasized that it is vital in collegiate athletic training to measure the behavior of athletes.

“She is absolutely right. It is hard to work with patients who do not comply in rehabilitation,” said Paul Alvarez, athletic training and education program director. “Her research will help us treat the patients better because we can identify the problem.”

Granquist is continuing to refine the RAdMAT at the University of La Verne.

“Right now I have a couple of students helping with data collection,” she said. “I am collaborating on research with Joanna Engel, who is the director of athletic training services.”

Granquist has asked student athletes and athletic trainers to rate rehabilitation adherence of an injury over one week, one month and finally three months.

“I have friends who have been in rehab and I think it would be interesting to see if they think rehabilitation adherence affects their healing,” said Amanda McCadden, junior liberal studies major. “Having 30 student athletes in our training room is a lot, but at bigger schools I cannot image how chaotic it would be to fill out surveys.”

Granquist hopes that the RAdMAT will be further tested and refined in her continued research to establish the measure’s effectiveness in athletic training practice.

Granquist received her bachelor of science degree in physical education at Pacific Lutheran University and her master of science in sports medicine and biomechanics at the University of Oregon. She received her doctorate from the University of North Carolina.

Aisha Gonzales can be reached at aisha.gonzales@laverne.edu.

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