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NBA athletic trainer talks business

Tom Abdenour of the Golden State Warriors visits La Verne.

Tom Abdenour, head athletic trainer for the Golden State Warriors came to the University of La Verne campus Monday. He answered questions and told stories to students about his career, which includes 21 seasons with the Warriors. Abdenour also was the athletic trainer for the gold medal-winning USA men’s basketball team at the Summer Olympics in 2000. Abdenour, who graduated from Wayne State University in Detroit, lives in San Leandro with his wife and three children. / photo by Erin Maxwell

Tom Abdenour, head athletic trainer for the Golden State Warriors came to the University of La Verne campus Monday. He answered questions and told stories to students about his career, which includes 21 seasons with the Warriors. Abdenour also was the athletic trainer for the gold medal-winning USA men’s basketball team at the Summer Olympics in 2000. Abdenour, who graduated from Wayne State University in Detroit, lives in San Leandro with his wife and three children. / photo by Erin Maxwell

Dan Sayles
Sports Editor

Tom Abdenour, head athletic trainer for the Golden State Warriors, spoke to 24 athletic training students on Monday. He touched on a variety of topics ranging from terminology used among athletic trainers, to interactions with the media and details of his own personal life.

“It was really informative,” said Ariel Guldstrand, sophomore athletic trainer student at the University of La Verne. “It brought a different perspective on athletic trainers from a professional level to students from college.”

“We appreciated him taking the time to come out to talk to us,” said Brianna Cardenas, senior athletic training major.

Abdenour has worked in the NBA for 20 years, and is currently under the employment of the Golden State Warriors as head athletic trainer.

Abdenour began a brief introduction, and talked about the terminology of athletic trainers and the Associated Press, and pointed out that the press sometimes just labels athletic trainers as trainers, which is not the same thing.

“It’s incumbent on us to give it our best shot,” Abdenour said when asked about how they treated injured players.

“If a guy is injured, everyone gives him 101 percent,” Abdenour said, regardless of what the relationship between the player and athletic trainer was.

When asked about the most traumatic injury one of his patients had to endure while being an athletic trainer, he talked about a student athlete who was going up for a lay-up, and somewhere along the way, had gotten a thumb inside his eye, suffering intense pain and visual impairment, Abdenour said.

He also demonstrated some techniques that the athlete trainers used to gauge an athlete’s body, using Guldstrand to demonstrate how strong her lower back was as well as her shoulder tractors, hip balance, techniques the athletic trainers used to anticipate potential issues.

The topic of money and wages was also raised.

“How do we convince the administrators that we are worth a better wage?” he asked.

He also dispensed some advice to the potential student athletes present there at the lecture.

“Work hard,” Abdenour said to the students. “Expand your horizons however you can.”

Dan Sayles can be reached at dan.sayles@laverne.edu.

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