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'Tomorrow Never Knows' art's enigmas

The “Tomorrow Never Knows” exhibition included installations of sculptures and drawings by Ruby Osorio and Macha Suzuki. Suzuki’s work, “Fail,” is a mixed media piece. The reception for the artists took place on Tues., Oct. 27, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Harris Art Gallery. The exhibition runs through Nov. 24.  / photo by Stephanie Arellanes

The “Tomorrow Never Knows” exhibition included installations of sculptures and drawings by Ruby Osorio and Macha Suzuki. Suzuki’s work, “Fail,” is a mixed media piece. The reception for the artists took place on Tues., Oct. 27, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Harris Art Gallery. The exhibition runs through Nov. 24. / photo by Stephanie Arellanes

Dan Sayles
Sports Editor

The Harris Art Gallery has a new exhibit. “Tomorrow Never Knows,” includes sculptures as well as paintings, depicting an almost ephemeral flourish of animals and humans.

The exhibit had a particularly strong reception with positive feedback for the two artists, Ruby Osorio and Macha Suzuki.

“It is interesting and good to come out to look at art,” said Tony Pagan, a graduate student in business.

The paintings created by Ruby Osorio display soft colors.

Pale blues and violet hues are dominant, though her medium is not strictly limited to watercolors.

In Osorio’s second row of paintings, is a horse that seems to be either dead or sleeping.

Osorio utilizes a number of different mediums, combining watercolors, acrylic ink, a collage and airbrushing to bring to life a surreal scene. Such a scene leaves the audience questioning the state the equine animal seems to be in.

Breaking up the succession of Osorio paintings is a sculpture made from string and branches by Macha Suzuki.

The yellowish-orange string wrapped around specific parts on the branches, maneuvers itself to spell out “Fail” for the similarly named piece.

There is no particular event, person, or thing that the word “fail” could be readily seen for. Instead, it invites the viewer to think hard for the meaning, drawing from it, the whole theme of the exhibit.

“It is very appealing,” said Al Clark, associate vice president of academic affairs. “Every piece is imaginative.”

In “Black Swan Effect,” Suzuki uses leaves painted gold to offset the pitch-black swan in the arms of a girl.

The painting is a contrast to some of the earlier paintings in the exhibit, having red and other bold colors, rather than the quiet colors seen earlier.

Still, it is done gracefully, using a number of different materials to accentuate the depiction of both girl and swan.

“The paintings are amazing,” said Gustavo Raynal, an artist that was visiting the exhibit. “Both are playing with enigma.”

According to Raynal, it also creates a whole new mythology.

On the opposite end of the wall is another of Osorio’s pieces titled, “Let it Fall.”

It returns to the soft velvety hues, portraying a woman lying down with peacock feathers around her.

It is interesting to note that her use of contrasting elements include different textures of paint with some light and dark watercolors for her hair, dark blue watercolors for the dress, and acrylic lines and spirals for her body.

Of course, Suzuki has the most curious attractions of the exhibit.

Perhaps the most notable one of the series is “Minor Threat,” which has a model sheep with a number of arrows surrounding it, suspended by a string from the ceiling.

It gives the impression that time has stopped, or perhaps gives a warped perception that the people who stray too close to the exhibit are the threat, judging by how close the arrows move to the sheep when disturbed.

Embedded in the poor ewe are two arrows, one orange and one pink, each wound bleeding the corresponding arrows color, which has a pleasant contrast to the otherwise colorless animal.

Suzuki also has three other sculptures, two untitled pieces that depict sheep grazing and looking down deep holes, and the third displaying a rat scurrying down a platform with a yellow flower in its mouth.

These pieces have certainly fallen in line with the ‘mysterious’ theme portrayed in the exhibit.

“Tomorrow Never Knows” runs through Nov. 24.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, or by appointment.

Dan Sayles can be reached at dan.sayles@laverne.edu.

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