You are here: Home // Arts, Etc., Fine Art // Carlson Gallery exhibit showcases natural beauty

Carlson Gallery exhibit showcases natural beauty

Photographer Francis Schanberger attended a virtual reception in his honor in the Irene Carlson Gallery of Photography last week. Fred Yaffe, director of the Institutional Review Board, and Kevin Bowman, photography department manager, spoke with Schanberger about his technique using a flat-bed scanner to make negatives for contact printing onto hand-coated art papers. Called “Van Dyke Brown,” the printing process was invented by Sir John Herschel in 1843. “Forces of Nature,” will remain on display until Feb. 19. / photo by Nicholas Mitzenmacher

Photographer Francis Schanberger attended a virtual reception in his honor in the Irene Carlson Gallery of Photography last week. Fred Yaffe, director of the Institutional Review Board, and Kevin Bowman, photography department manager, spoke with Schanberger about his technique using a flat-bed scanner to make negatives for contact printing onto hand-coated art papers. Called “Van Dyke Brown,” the printing process was invented by Sir John Herschel in 1843. “Forces of Nature,” will remain on display until Feb. 19. / photo by Nicholas Mitzenmacher

Tiffany Spears
Staff Writer

The “Forces of Nature” exhibit held its reception at the Irene Carlson Gallery in Miller Hall on last week displaying photos of perception and nature.

The photos were on display, complimented by spot lights in the center of the room. They could have been easily mistaken for drawings or paintings.

The pieces depict nature on five different panels adding a degree of complexity to the photographs.

Francis Schanberger, the artist behind the project, chose his topic for his photographs because of all the nature that surrounded his home state.

“I can’t escape the trees in Ohio,” Schanberger said.

Several of his photos feature the fine details of large leaves and stems.

Schanberger spent two years creating his photos and his hard work is evident in the gallery.

Schanberger uses the flatbed scanner to bring out the vivid details of nature in his photographs.

He decided to use Vandyke Brown, a printing process used in the early 19th century, to experiment on the various papers.

Schanberger applies the Vandyke Brown process and science to create his photos. His experiment undoubtedly was a success and adds a contemporary spin to an old process.
Having spent most of his life in California, it was a change of scenary moving to Ohio.

Schanberger recalls a family trip to the East Coast when he was younger, where he noticed all the greenery along the highway.

Although not all of 26 photographs are color, the black and white backgrounds of the photos make their diversity prominent.

“The photographs are 3D without the 3D glasses,” said Gary Colby, professor of photography.

The dimensions in every photograph can only be seen by taking a closer look. Spectators must stop and take their time examining each photo.

“Many people have told me that the photos remind them of their childhood,” Schanberger said.

Some photos are named for exactly how they look, such as “Decaying Leaf,” which has the potential to bring back childhood memories of playing with leaves outside in the fall.

Many of the photos have the power to make one reflect on the beauty of the simple things in life, while displaying extraordinary art.

Schanberger’s photographs are a hit among students and faculty; yet he is, like many other artists, thinking about his next project.

“I’m interested in what is around the corner and I always want to show my new stuff,” Schanberger said.

Another advantage of having this exhibit at University of La Verne is all the people who come to observe and discover a new form of art.

“It brings people together with all different perspectives,” Colby said.

People not only come to see the photos, but to chat with others who share a common interest in art. Many students come to be enlightened about art or simply because their class requires them to be there.

“I’m in Gary Colby’s class and see the photographs every day and never stopped to look at them individually but it is very interesting,” Victoria Castaneda, a freshman communications major, said.

The photo exhibit is not only a learning experience but is a chance for anyone to meet new people, enjoy good company, and most of all walk away with a better appreciation of the natural beauty all around.

The “Forces of Nature” photographs have been on display in the Irene Carlson Gallery since Jan. 25 and guests can still enjoy them until Feb. 19, when the exhibit ends.

Tiffany Spears can be reached at tiffany.spears@laverne.edu.

Post Revisions:

There are no revisions for this post.

Related posts:

  1. Carlson Gallery exhibit explores new work
  2. Landscape relationships on display in Carlson Gallery
  3. New exhibit encourages exploration
  4. Students reflect on ‘Natural History’
  5. Photo exhibit focuses on laborers

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Copyright © 2009 Campus Times. All rights reserved.
Designed by Theme Junkie. Powered by WordPress.