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Space inspires art for new Tall Wall exhibit

Sherin Guirguis talks with artist Almond Zigmund during the opening reception of the exhibition, “Plane Suite,” a two-dimensional installation on the Tall Wall. Zigmund earned a bachelor’s degree from Parsons School of Design in New York and Paris and an MFA from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The artist’s reception was held Tuesday. Zigmund’s installation is featured on the Tall Wall Space in the Arts and Communications Building until Dec. 10. / photo by Stephanie Arellanes

Sherin Guirguis talks with artist Almond Zigmund during the opening reception of the exhibition, “Plane Suite,” a two-dimensional installation on the Tall Wall. Zigmund earned a bachelor’s degree from Parsons School of Design in New York and Paris and an MFA from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The artist’s reception was held Tuesday. Zigmund’s installation is featured on the Tall Wall Space in the Arts and Communications Building until Dec. 10. / photo by Stephanie Arellanes

Samantha Sincock
Copy Editor

The Tall Wall exhibit lit up the Arts and Communications Building with a reception held on Tuesday evening.

“I’ve never seen anything like it before, so different, so beautiful,” said junior art major Cheryle Townsend gazing upon the large arrangement of patterns.

The Tall Wall illuminated from a single collection of bulbs from the left of the decorated space. Black stencils formed separated walls set adjacent to brightly colored boxes. As people trickled through the communications department doors, crowds formed at the base of the art piece in wonder at the site.

“It looks like a two dimensional view into her life. Her stencils allow openness and yet at the same time privacy,” said Townsend regarding Almond Zigmund’s “Plane Suite” installation. Zigmund has been chosen as the 2010 artist of the year to be featured in the building.

Born in California, Zigmund now lives in East Hampton, N.Y. She discovered this opportunity a year ago from her long friend and colleague Dion Johnson.

“Dion and I showed together in the same gallery in Ohio two years ago. He offered this opportunity up to me and I was thrilled to accept,” Zigmund said.

Her dramatic shifts in scale sharpen the perceptions of those who come to view the physically gripping assembly.

“The various angles in the building is inherent to Almond’s work and so they work together in perfect harmony,” Johnson said.

“It is very extraordinary and detailed, almost like it was hand painted over an extended amount of time,” said junior multimedia major Candice Salazar.

“I really find it super modern and I absolutely love the depth position of the light fixture,” said sophomore art history major Margo Cash.

Cash stood at the base of the art piece, conversing with individuals about over-all composition and feel of the piece for a project in one of her honors courses.

“I think it really says something about the use of vintage and eclectic devices, how they can be cohesive with modern day art,” Cash explained to a group of students.

Zigmund’s inspiration was not as specific, but came from the space she was given for her art.

“I have a sort of different compendium of patterns and shapes, themes of which I pull from,” Zigmund said. “My inspiration is not of one thought but the space itself, I saw the wall and began. The drawing simply formed itself.”

The “Plane Suite” will be on display until Dec. 10, allowing students and faculty to analyze not only the art but also life by provoking thought.

“This piece is more than interesting, it has implied depth, simple yet complex, it is going to keep many looking for its stay,” Townsend said.

Jose Hernandez contributed to this story.

Samantha Sincock can be reached at samantha.sincock@laverne.edu.

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