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There’s more to life than your cell phone

Kristen Campbell, Editor in Chief

As of July, I finally entered the 21st century of technology; I got my first cell phone.

Yes, be shocked. I constantly heard throughout high school and my freshman year of college comments of astonishment whenever I would say I did not have a cell phone. My friends and classmates were obsessed with their phones and would be near a heart attack if they misplaced it for two seconds.

When I got my phone, it was not a huge deal to suddenly be in constant contact with everyone; it was more annoying than anything.

When I was a camp counselor, we were only allowed to have our cell phones during our break time so the girls would not be mad that the “no cell phone” rule did not apply to us.

The moment my fellow counselors and I went on break, they grabbed their phones and chatted and texted their break away.

Yes, I called home to check on my loved ones but then the phone went right back to the sisters’ office. Most of my hour or two-hour break was used to relax in peace so I could have enough strength for the rest of the day.

As every Californian knows, there are laws restricting sending text messages or talking on the phone while driving. However I see nearly 20 people or 30 people daily talking and texting while driving. I doubt 99 percent of the messages and phone calls are emergencies.

Even if the message is an emergency, the driver should be responsible and pull over to answer the caller or texter.

It is completely unnecessary to constantly talk to people. A human has never died from having to drive without talking or texting. Generally, I hate it when I am driving behind someone and they are going slower than the speed limit.

When I go around them and I glance over at the driver, their eyes are usually pointed down looking at their phones as to be sneaky to not get a ticket.

So instead of just listening to the law, which was set in place for our protection, people are so obsessed with their phones that they would rather put themselves and everyone else in danger.

And then, when we attend class at the University of La Verne, for which we pay nearly $30,000 a year in tuition, rarely anyone pays attention but instead text their friends about how bored they are.

Then when it comes time to midterms and finals, they complain that they do not understand the concepts and are going to fail their class.

Yes we are allowed to spend our class time as we please because we are paying for it, but if it is going to hinder our learning, putting our cell phones down for an hour will not kill us. I promise.

Cell phones are very convenient and I find myself using mine fairly often.

But I could probably count specific reasons for using it on one hand. Although I have nearly 200 contacts, I talk to possibly 20 of them on a regular basis. Since my phone is not used as much as most phones, my battery can last me for two or even three days, which saves energy.

Since I do not use my phone in class I am passing all of my classes.

I do not use my phone in my car so I am always aware of my surroundings when driving.

Go ahead and keep using your phones but do not count me in that bunch.

Kristen Campbell, a sophomore journalism major, is editor in chief of the Campus Times. She can be reached by e-mail at kristen.campbell@laverne.edu.

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