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Paintings use abstract color to show daily life

Jesse Evans
Staff Writer

The West Gallery in the Campus Center opened its new gallery series, “A Man in the Garden,” with a reception Tuesday.

The series is by Iranian artist Zohreh Moysaybei and Dion Johnson, gallery curator, picked three of the 10 paintings from the series.

“The colors are unique and capture the different emotions, people and times of day.” Johnson said.

Photo reproductions of the art were in the gallery.

Although real paintings could not be on hand, you could still see the amazing colors that Moysaybei used.

Moysaybei majored in English literature at Shiraz Univeristy in Iran.

Her original paintings are made with charcoal, crayon and oil.

Most of these paintings and her other series are still in Shiraz.

“It’s very organic and very surreal,” Eric Almanza, senior art major, said. “It seems like there’s a story in each painting.”

Two of the paintings utilize a similar color scheme. Despite this color scheme they deal with different subjects.

All of the paintings present or incorporate a nonhuman figure such as a cat or an insect.

Two of the three paintings have what appears to be warriors preparing for battle or hunting.

The differences can be seen in the body language of the person in the painting and the way the animal is used in the artwork.

Moysaybei’s colors and characters almost make it look like a story.

However with only three paintings on hand it makes viewers wonder what the rest of the paintings are like.

Moysaybei could not be on hand for the opening of the gallery.

However she did hand-deliver the photographs from Iran and Johnson had the honor of meeting her.

Moysaybei has close relations to the University of La Verne because her son is math instructor Yousef Daneshbod.

“These pieces are the more realistic of her series,” Daneshbod said.

“This series is more expressive and the others tend to be more abstract.”

Having family there made it that much more special because you got the opportunity to hear from a family member’s perspective.

Daneshbod believes that the theme of this series was possibly representing man’s imaginary mind.

At the same time he believes that his mom was leaving the theme up to the viewer to decide.

Vivid colors were used in the paintings to express different emotions.

“The furthest one on the right is my favorite,” Benjamin Balderrama Jr., senior psychology major, said.

“It stands out from the rest because of the more vivid colors.”

Johnson recommends coming during the afternoon to see the series because you get a lot more natural light shining on the images.

You can see Moysaybei’s series, “A Man in the Garden” through March 15.

Jesse Evans can be reached at jesse.evans@laverne.edu.

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