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Dyck looks at helping relationships

Assistant Professor of Management Loren Dyck presents his research on physician-patient communication Monday in the President’s Dining Room. Dyck said he struggled to get data for his dissertation because it took him a year to get busy medical students to sign the waiver and mail it in. / photo by Pablo Cabrera

Assistant Professor of Management Loren Dyck presents his research on physician-patient communication Monday in the President’s Dining Room. Dyck said he struggled to get data for his dissertation because it took him a year to get busy medical students to sign the waiver and mail it in. / photo by Pablo Cabrera

Michelle Nunez
Staff Writer

Faculty members and students were pleased after hearing Loren Dyck, assistant professor of management, discuss physician-patient relationships.

The lecture, “Resonance and Dissonance in Professional Helping Relationships at the Dyadic Level: Determining the Influence of Positive and Negative Emotional Attractors on Effective Physician-Patient Communication,” was held Monday in the President’s Dining Room as part of the weekly faculty lecture series.

Dyck’s research involved looking at the impact of effective and non-effective communication by medical students who examined patients during brief diagnostic encounters as part of a clinical skills exam at Midwestern University.

His study analyzed 116-videotaped encounters between medical students from the graduating classes of 2008 and 2009.

“The professor and student has a huge advantage in the sense that they have a potential for much more time… they are both affiliated with the same university, and probably live in the same area,” Dyck said.

With easy access to professors between classes, the student and professor relationship has the opportunity to become stronger.

Faculty members at the lecture agreed that the most important thing was how the concept of patient and doctor relationships related to the student-professor relationship and how both concepts related to each other.

There are many ways of establishing relationships and an overall positive tone is important, Dyck said.

“The biggest hope for me is that anyone could join me in the inquiry, how we can better the human condition… to recognize that each of us has influence and impact,” Dyck said.

Peggy Redman, professor of education, said she wants to re-enforce the positive tone for the faculty student relationship.

“I am a believer that positive is always better than negative, and what I think I came away with is what it means in the medical field but we can also take that and we can also impose it on our field as professors,” Redman said.

Marilyn Oliver, professor of movement and sports science, said the findings could be used in the classroom when teaching her students the physician to patient relationship.

“It was interesting for me to see his research on the positive attitudes when the physician comes in because it is something I can utilize with my students, and when you come in and you are positive and you direct your attention to the patient they feel better and here is research to substantiate that.” Oliver said.

“He could quantify with the research what we felt for a long time… You go to the doctor, if they make you feel good you want to listen to them and want to put your health in their hands,” Oliver said. “Quantita­tive evidence that it makes a difference in the relationship.”

Michelle Nunez can be reached at michelle.nunez@laverne.edu.

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