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Lance Armstrong: just another liar in sports

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Lance Armstrong is undoubtedly a known name in the current athletic world after winning seven Tour de France races. However recently, Armstrong is not known for his success as a cyclist, but rather the cheating behind it.

Armstrong was not only a stand-out in the cycling industry, he was an inspiration to millions of people as a cancer survivor. That was before he was caught doping in several of his winning races, including the 2000 Olympics.

Recently, Armstrong was asked to give back the bronze medal he won in the Olympics and his several other titles.

But that was not enough: Armstrong got away with lying to millions of supporters in his published memoirs. In fact, the judge in Texas sided with Armstrong and he got out of a $5 million lawsuit on Sept. 10.

Many memoir readers against Armstrong and his publishers brought on the case of libel, but they lost in the California court. U.S. District Judge Morrison England sided with Armstrong and the defendants who claimed that they were protected under the First Amendment, according to ESPN.

Millions of people supported Armstrong through LIVESTRONG, which was launched in 1997. Fans supported cancer research and treatment by wearing yellow LIVESTRONG bracelets to promote the movement and his name. Armstrong had to give up this charity and organization after his downfall.

His downfall came when competitor and friend Floyd Landis confessed about his own doping experiences and mentioned Armstrong as an accomplice. At first, Armstrong denied all allegations made against him and even attempted to sue those who were investigating.

“We sued so many people,” Armstrong told Oprah Winfrey in his one-on-one interview after being caught. Many of those people who were sued were actually telling the truth and still lost to him in court, according to CNN reporter Ben Brumfield.

But the investigators quickly discovered his lies and exposed everything in a 202 page report. In October 2012, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency banned Armstrong for life.

Armstrong also got out of other lawsuits that were thrown at him after his confession, proving that money really can buy freedom. His money, that was earned through his fame as a cancer surviving cyclist who could still compete after losing so much. But in reality, he was using the blood juice to push him along the way. He played one great hero and an even better actor.

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