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Lagumbay gets caught up in the music

Senior music major Emmanuel Lagumbay spends much of his free time composing music and trying out new compositions in the music library in Founders Hall. Last Thursday, Lagumbay was composing a new piece in the digital audio workshop, Cubase, using the MIDI keyboard to input notes into the program. / photo by Sarah Golden

Senior music major Emmanuel Lagumbay spends much of his free time composing music and trying out new compositions in the music library in Founders Hall. Last Thursday, Lagumbay was composing a new piece in the digital audio workshop, Cubase, using the MIDI keyboard to input notes into the program. / photo by Sarah Golden

Kat Simonelli
Assistant Editor

Senior music major and video game enthusiast Emmanuel Lagumbay has high hopes of jumping head first into the video game industry with his innovative, original compositions.

Lagumbay put together a concert chock full of original compositions and arrangements that were inspired by his favorite video games as a part of his senior project and brought his audience to their feet after each song.

“I liked that his songs were all inspired by video games,” said Levi Reed, junior music major and Lagumbay’s friend. “I think that’s not something that a lot of people have a passion for but it is really interesting.”

Lagumbay found his inspiration behind becoming a musician and later a composer at an early age when he had the chance to watch the middle school band in his area in concert at his elementary school.

“This sax player played a song from ‘Lord of the Rings’ and I kind of thought, ‘I need to play music now,’” Lagumbay said.

Lagumbay’s competitive side was the driving force behind his interest in composing his own musical scores.

“In seventh grade I had performed a piece that was written by an eighth grader that went to our school, and honestly, I think it was the competitive part of me that was like, ‘Oh well he did that in eighth grade, so then in my eighth grade year I’m going to do the same thing,’” he said.

“So I wrote a piece in eighth grade and I showed it to my teacher, and she was like ‘Wow, we should have this performed,’ and we did,” he said.

Now Lagumbay is able to reach a broader audience with his music because of the Internet.

He has had some correspondences with people from around the world that have expressed great interest and excitement about his musical compositions.

“People in like Germany and Oregon are telling me ‘I’m enjoying your music’ and ‘I really like this’ and I’m thinking ‘I have never met you and I may never meet you, but you are making my music a part of your life and that is awesome,’” Lagumbay said.

These connections help inspire Lagumbay to want to write more and become more well known.

“That’s just the beauty of music for me, you can connect to other people that you’ve never met and then you can relate to them through music,” he said.

Though he had been involved in many musical ensembles including a total of four years of competing and performing with the nationally acclaimed drum corps Pacific Crest, Lagumbay found his passion for music all over again once he started to think about what he wanted to major in while he was attending college.

He explained that he went through quite a few major changes before realizing that his real passion had always lied with music and that was what he was really meant to do.

“I came here as a psych major, but then I was like ‘I want to do something with criminal minds,’” Lagumbay said. “So I became a criminology major, but then I thought, ‘Well, it’s easier to get a gig doing computer science stuff for a criminology department,’ so I decided to become a computer science major, and then I took calculus and I decided that was the time to switch back to my passion of music.”

Lagumbay’s senior project concert was put together to pay homage to those composers that have influenced the way that he writes his music and the way that he thinks about music in general.

With only three orchestral rehearsals on total, he put a great deal of confidence in his volunteer musicians’ abilities.

“I liked that you didn’t have to be an avid gamer to enjoy the compositions,” said Elizabeth Garcia, junior psychology major and friend of Lagumbay. “They were a little challenging to play, but that never took away from the fun of performing.”

Kat Simonelli can be reached at kathryn.simonelli@laverne.edu.

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