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Bill threatens food safety

Less than three weeks apart, Iowa and Utah governors signed a bill, named by New York Times food writer Mark Bittman, the “Ag-Gag” bill, that stops undercover animal abuse investigations. Recent undercover investigations of animal abuse on factory farms have relied on video footage provided by activists and reporters who have taken undercover jobs on these farms. This bill makes it a crime for... 

Online journalism ethics addressed

Online journalism ethics addressed
Elizabeth Zwerling, associate professor of journalism, offered a lecture on “Ethics (and the Lack of Ethics) in Electronic Media” Monday in the President Dining Room. Various faculty members participated in discussion of the topic. Many ethical problems were brought up, for which there are no easy solutions. Still Zwerling said journalists must embrace the new communications modes. / photo by Debora... 

Let us do our job

A reporter for The Economist was temporarily handcuffed outside a room where Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney was giving a victory speech. Natasha Loder had been assigned to cover the speech in Novi, Mich., but she and several other reporters had been corralled into a nearby room to watch the speech on television. When Loder realized that the video feed she and the other reporters were watching... 

Commentary: A psychonaut’s adventures in videoland

<i>Commentary</i>: A psychonaut's adventures in videoland
Amanda Nieto, Arts Editor Journalists are driven by curiosity. Their job is centered on asking questions, finding answers and relaying their findings to an audience. Hamilton Morris, a 24-year-old writer and filmmaker, is one such curious seeker who has taken his work to other-worldly dimensions through his quest to bring firsthand accounts on psychedelic drugs. In his series for Vice.com titled “Hamilton’s... 

News is more than celebrity

News is more than celebrity
Editorial Cartoon by Jason D. Cox At the University of La Verne, especially in the departments that are immersed into current events, many professors open each class session with the question, “Did you hear anything interesting happen in the news?” We are used to the silent response from our classmates as we look around the classroom, avoiding eye contact with the professor. Either that, or the... 

Dead celebrities kill media credibility

Steve Jobs drove a Mercedes without any license plates and was never ticketed for it. Steve Jobs was a supposed deadbeat dad. Steve Jobs died at such an early age of 56. Steve Jobs. Amy Winehouse. Michael Jackson. Heath Ledger. Anna Nicole Smith. These, among many more, are the names that reigned your television sets 24 hours, eight days a week. While across the nation, police brutally assault protesters... 

Journalists deserve more credit

When some people think about journalists, they think of primped up people who talk to a camera or go find out which celebrities are pregnant for their job at TMZ. In truth, some journalists risk their lives for important work. Lara Logan, CBS chief foreign correspondent, was sexually assaulted and beaten by a mob during her coverage of the celebration after President Hosni Mubarak stepped down in Egypt.... 
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N.Y. Times: Fire McKinley

From the earliest days on the job, journalists are taught to report honestly and adhere to a specific code of ethics. One would assume that a reporter for the New York Times would be especially well-rehearsed in following these codes. However, New York Times reporter James C. McKinley proved this assumption wrong in his recent article titled “Vicious Assault Shakes Texas Town.” The article reported... 

Commentary: Where has the real news gone?

<i>Commentary</i>: Where has the real news gone?
Kristen Campbell, Editor in Chief Two weeks ago one of my communications professors commented that his news quizzes, which cover the top 10 names in the past week’s news, usually have one recurring name throughout the semester and was hoping Charlie Sheen would be removed very soon. That comment got me thinking about the media’s story priorities. Why does the media have low standards? They are... 

Media should slow down

Since the invention of the Internet, the rate at which the media churns out news has been increasing at an extremely rapid pace. In the early years people could get news briefs on their home page when they logged into their AOL or Yahoo! account. That pace increased exponentially when Twitter made its way into our lives in 2006. Media outlets ranging from the highly respected CNN and Fox News to celebrity... 
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