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Military power goes too far

As United States citizens, we are often told about the horrors of the police state. Soldiers patrolling throughout cities, rifles at the ready to arrest and detain anyone engaging in suspicious behavior, with no one to answer to except for themselves. Most of us would like to believe that this type of atrocious action could never occur on home soil. However, thanks to the recent passing of the National... 

Debate on torture drowns credibility

Debate on torture drowns credibility
Editorial cartoon by Anthony Juarez Republican candidates at the foreign policy debate on Saturday were asked to share their views on torture. This question segued into their views on waterboarding. Both Congresswoman Michele Bachmann and Herman Cain said that if elected, they would return to the practice of waterboarding as an interrogation technique. Cain insisted the practice was an “enhanced... 

Juergensmeyer assesses war, terror

Juergensmeyer assesses war, terror
Showing slides from his most recent trip, Mark Juergensmeyer, director of the Orfalea Center of Global and International Studies at University of California at Santa Barbara, describes the nature of a peaceful gathering of pro-democracy demonstrators in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, that soon enough toppled the government of president Hosni Mubarak. / photo by Denisse Leung Ashley Lyn Sourapas Staff... 

Charles Doskow feels use of drones is legal

Charles Doskow feels use of drones is legal
Professor Charles Doskow from the University of La Verne College of Law spoke in the President’s Dining Room on Monday. In his lecture, “Defending Ourselves Against Terrorism: Targeted Killing by Drones,” he described the advantages and disadvantages of using remote controlled, unmanned machines to target terrorists abroad. Doskow served as the dean of the College of Law from 1980 to 1985,... 

No blood for oil

On March 28, President Barack Obama addressed the nation to answer the questions surrounding why the United States is taking part in the airstrikes in Libya. In a recent interview with NBC News, Obama defended his decision for the U.S. to intervene in Libya by stating that actions had to be made quickly to save civilian lives. This need for immediate action is the reason why Obama did not seek authorization... 

Helping our soldiers at home

It is important to learn from mistakes. When a light socket electrocutes you, it would be smart to not touch the socket again. In terms of helping soldiers to adapt to life after war, the United States has latched onto an electrical circuit and is frying. Look back to the Vietnam War. Soldiers came back with mental illnesses that had not even been diagnosed before and were left to fend for themselves... 

Let’s maintain some privacy

As Americans, we sometimes have a false sense of security. We expect our phone calls to be heard only by the person on the other end of the line, and an occasional little brother listening through another phone. We expect our mail to be delivered to the person to whom it is addressed. We expect our e-mail to be read only by the intended recipient. As a response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the... 

Islam is not the enemy

Muslims have been the recipients of a multitude of hate in the last few weeks. Protesters have stormed the city of New York in opposition to the construction of a mosque two blocks away from the former World Trade Center. A minister in Florida gained headlines when he proposed a “Burning of Qu’ran” day coinciding with the commemoration of 9/11. Even shows like “South Park” and “American... 

Afghan scholars visit ULV for symposium

Mark Vidal Editorial Director A lack of education and the absence of cultural understanding were among the reasons cited for human rights violations in Afghanistan at the Afghanistan and State Building Symposium last Friday, hosted by the La Verne College of Law. The symposium, well attended by local and international dignitaries, featured panel speakers from Afghanistan, the U.S. Afghan Women’s... 

Panel addresses Afghan rebuilding

Michael Phillips Staff Writer More than 70 people, of whom many were lawyers, gathered in the Campus Center to examine the reconstruction of Afghanistan and the United States’ role in the rebuilding process. The second half of the Afghanistan symposium was a panel discussion titled “Phase and Priorities of Reconstruc­tion.” The subjects discussed were law, economics and humanitarianism. “What... 
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