Skip to main content
Luci Martin

Luci Martin

Associate Professor, Psychology

Main: (909) 448-4091
Hoover Building 206

Assistant Professor of Psychology. Dr. Martin completed her pre-doctoral internship at the Boston Consortium and received her Ph.D. in Clinical Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine from the University of North Texas in 2011. Her current interests are in the area of preventive care and health promotion within diverse patient and non-medical populations. Her research has focused on gender and ethnic differences in health outcomes and includes a combination of work with coping and quality of life within chronically ill populations and assessment of psychological and physiological variables aimed toward prevention. Clinical interests include use of evidence based cognitive and behavioral methods that aid adjustment to disease and allow medical patients to live a healthier lifestyle with optimal life quality. Dr. Martin is a licensed psychologist and designated as core doctoral faculty. She teaches courses in the areas of health psychology and assessment.

Interests

Research

My research interests are in the area of preventive care and health promotion within diverse patient and non-medical populations. Understanding how to predict disease and implement interventions to motivate individuals to pursue a healthier lifestyle is necessary in a society that has seen a rapid rise in obesity, physical inactivity and lifestyle related diseases, particularly within minority populations. My research has focused on gender and ethnic differences in health outcomes and includes a combination of work with coping and quality of life within chronically ill populations and assessment of psychological and physiological variables aimed toward prevention.

Clinical

My clinical interests are in the area of health psychology and behavioral medicine. I have used evidence based cognitive and behavioral methods that aid adjustment to disease and allow medical patients to live a healthier lifestyle with optimal life quality.

Teaching

My philosophy in teaching is to provide an inspirational environment where students feel safe and able to explore their thoughts and beliefs. I encourage students to embrace challenges and be willing to make mistakes in order to grow. Success in academic study requires intrinsic motivation to pursue interests and to set and attain viable goals. Teaching allows me to continue my pursuit of knowledge as well as inspire students to do the same. I value learning and view education as an entertaining and challenging venue for intellectual stimulation. Teaching allows me to provide a fun and interactive environment where students can learn and appreciate knowledge as I do.

Publications

Recent Publications and Presentations:
  • Martin, L. A., Critelli, W., Doster, J., Powers, C., Purdum, M., Doster, M., & Lambert, P. (2013). Cardiovascular risk: Gender differences in coping strategies and lifestyle behaviors in college students. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 20, 97-105.
  • Martin, L. A., Vosvick, M., & Riggs, S. (2012). Attachment, forgiveness and physical health quality of life in HIV+ adults. AIDS Care, 24, 1333-1340.
  • Prazak, M., Critelli, J. W., Martin, L. A., Miranda, V., Purdum, M. & Powers, C. (2012). Mindfulness and its role in physical and psychological health. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-being, 4, 91-105.
  • Martin, L. A., Doster, J., Critelli, W., Purdum, M., Powers, C., Lambert, P., & Miranda, V. (2011). The “Distressed” personality, coping, and cardiovascular risk. Stress and Health, 27, 64-72.
  • Martin, L. A., Doster, J., Critelli, J., Lambert, P., Purdum, M., Powers, C., & Prazak, M. (2010). Ethnicity and Type D Personality as predictors of heart rate variability. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 76, 118-121.
  • Vosvick, M., Martin, L. A., Smith, N. G., & Jenkins, S. R. (2010). Gender differences in HIV-related coping and depression. AIDS & Behavior, 14, 390-400.
  • Price, E., Martin, L. A., Critelli, J. W., Prazak, M. Purdum, M. & Powers, C. (2013). Gender Differences in Mindfulness Skills and Physical Symptoms in Young Adults. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 45, Abstract Supplement, B-133.
  • Martin, L. A. & Vosvick, M. (2013, March). Minority status, attachment and forgiveness a predictors of quality of life. Poster presented at the Society of Behavioral Medicine Convention.
  • Martin, L. A., Critelli, J. W., Purdum, M., Powers, C., Miranda, V., & Prazak, M. (2012). Inhibition of Negative Affect and Lifestyle Behaviors as Predictors of Cardiovascular Functioning. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 43, Supplement, 1.
  • Martin, L. A., Wolf, E., & Mori, D. (2012). Cognitive and Psychosocial Predictors of Mortality in Veterans with End Stage Renal Disease. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 43, Supplement, 1.
On sabbatical Fall 2019