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Leticia Arellano

Leticia Arellano

Associate Professor, Psychology

Main: (909) 448-4019

Interests

Teaching

I enjoy teaching courses from our graduate and undergraduate programs. I enjoy using various types of teaching approaches and technologies, particularly didactic approaches that allow for student input. I feel these approaches help create diverse learning opportunities. I enjoy teaching courses that enable students to apply the course content to their daily lives and the world around them. My favorite didactic courses include: multicultural psychology, multicultural counseling, interviewing and counseling skills, abnormal psychology, and principles of psychology.

Multiculturalism is an important element of my personal and professional life. I also feel it is important to include multiculturalism within our curriculum and recently developed PSY 409: Multicultural Psychology. If I were to develop a new course, it would focus on alternative approaches to wellness. I would call this course “Indigenous Mental Health.” In this particular course, students would explore the various curative approaches utilized by persons throughout the world.

Research

My past research largely focused on Latina/o mental health. For example, my master’s thesis examined family functioning among Mexican American families. Similarly, my dissertation examined stress and coping among Latina professionals. In collaboration with my colleagues, I co-edited “The Handbook of Chicana/o Psychology and Mental Health.”

My research interests also extend into other areas, such as multiracial feminism, multicultural counseling, health disparities, and the experiences of ethnic minority college students.

Other Activities

In addition to my position as a faculty member, I am the Faculty Director of Research for the Mosaic Cultural Institute (MCI). Our research activities involve the use of an action research model to examine the experiences of culturally diverse college students, particularly African American students. Our current research projects focus on mentors, first generation college students, and faculty development.

Educational Background

  • M.C. Counseling, Arizona State University
  • Ph.D., Michigan State

Publications

  • Arellano, L.M., & Ayala-Alcantar, C. (2004). Multiracial Feminism for Chicana/o Psychology. In R.J. Velasquez, L.M. Arellano, & B. McNeill (Eds.), Handbook of Chicana/o Psychology and Mental Health (pp.215-230). Manwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum & Associates.
  • Gamst, G., Dana, R.H., Der-Karabetian, A., Aragon, M., Arellano, L.M., Morrow, G., & Martenson, L. (2004). Cultural competency revised: The California brief multicultural competence scale. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development,37, 163-183.
  • Velasquez, R.J., Arellano, L.M., & McNeill, B. (Eds.) (2004). Handbook of Chicana/o Psychology and Mental Health Manwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum & Associates.
  • Arellano, L., & Ayala-Alcantar, C.U. (2002, Spring). Does feminism have any utility for Latinas/os?. The Community Psychologist, 35 (2).
  • Gamst, G., Dana, R.H., Der-Karabetian, A., Aragon, M., Arellano, L.M., & Kramer, T. (2002). Effects of Latino acculturation and ethnic identity on mental health outcomes. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 24, 479-504.