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Jerry Kernes

Jerry Kernes

Associate Professor, Psychology

Main: (909) 448-4414

Interests

Teaching

I work to inspire and challenge my students. I approach these goals in a number of ways. I strive to help students understand the assumptions behind what they are learning, and I try to incorporate practical examples into my teaching. I believe that students learn best when the information they are learning is made relevant to their personal and professional lives. I infuse multiculturalism throughout my teaching. I make it a point to help students understand concepts through the lenses of gender, ethnicity, social class, and other factors. I view learning as being based upon six pillars: theory, research, practice, personal growth, professional development, and service. I like to use humor, demonstration, and other techniques to grab students’ attention and motivate them.

Research

The major focus of my research to date has been in the area of Positive Psychology which includes such characteristics as values, moral and ethical reasoning, subjective well-being, optimal human functioning, and meaning in life. I am interested in the ways in which helping professionals construct meaning in their personal and professional lives. I am particularly interested in the ways in which these constructions might impact clinical assessment and intervention.

Program Chair & Director of Clinical Training

I’m responsible for the administration of the Psy.D Program including such duties as: scheduling classes, recruiting and evaluating adjunct professors, coordinating graduate assistantships, monitoring students’ performance, facilitating completion of students’ dissertations, updating all program materials, maintaining contracts with external agencies, securing suitable practicum and internship placements for students, and maintaining the program’s accreditation. Most importantly, I see my primary role as fostering students professional development.

Educational Background

  • M.C., Arizona State University
  • Ph.D., Arizona State University

Publications

Presentations

  • Dearth, T.M., & Kernes, J.L. (2016). Stress and coping of mental health providers to the homeless. Poster to be presented at the 96th Annual Convention of the Western Psychological Association, Long Beach, CA.
  • Knauer-Turner, E., & Kernes, J.L. (2015). Sexual minorities’ internalized homophobia, experience of heterosexism, and use of humor. Paper presented at the 95th Annual Convention of the Western Psychological Association, Las Vegas, NV.
  • Waring, A., & Kernes, J. L. (2015). The influence of attachment and grit on life satisfaction and romantic relationship satisfaction.Paper presented at the 95th Annual Convention of the Western Psychological Association, Las Vegas, NV.

Publications

  • Kernes, J.L., & Kinnier, R.T. (2009). Folk Wisdom. In S.J. Lopez (Ed.). The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology (pp. 400-403). New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Kinnier, R.T., & Kernes, J.L. (2009). Did Viktor Frankl know the meaning of life? In A. Batthyany & J. Levinson (Eds.). Existential Psychotherapy of Meaning: Handbook of Logotherapy and Existential Analysis. (pp. 129-136). Phoenix: Zeig, Tucker, & Theisen.
  • Kernes, J.L. (2008). Does counseling need the mind? Counseling and Values, 52, 125-135.
  • Kernes, J.L., & Kinnier, R.T. (2008). Meaning in psychologists’ personal and professional lives. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 48 (2), 196-220.
  • Kinnier, R.T., Kernes, J.L., Hayman, J. Flynn, P., Simon, E., & Kilian, L. (2007). Values most extolled in Nobel peace prize speeches (Besides peace). Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied, 141 (6), 581-587.
  • Kinnier, R.T., Kernes, J.L., Van Puymbroeck, T., & Tribbensee, N. (Eds.). (2006). The meaning of life according to the great and the good. Palazzo Editions.
  • Kernes, J.L., & Kinnier, R.T. (2005). Psychologists’ search for the good life. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 45, 82-105.