October 19, 2011 by University of La Verne

What:  The University of La Verne’s College of Business and Public Administration is partnering with the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA),  Southern California Chapter to sponsor a moderated panel discussion on the causes and consequences of the state reform of redevelopment law which will have major financial and economic consequences for state and local governments in California.  The recently enacted laws abolish local redevelopment agencies and establish an alternate form of redevelopment agency which will be required to remit to the state about 40 percent of revenues. About 400 redevelopment agencies will remit a total of $1.7 billion in the first fiscal year and about $400 million per year subsequently to help offset the state budget deficit.  The panel will also discuss the California Supreme Court challenge filed by California’s cities and redevelopment agencies.


  • State Impacts:
    • Steve Shea, Senate President Pro-Tem Darrell Steinberg’s budget advisor, who played a key role in advancing the Legislature’s redevelopment reform measures
    • Marianne O’Malley, Legislative Analyst’s Office (invited), which examined the costs and benefits of redevelopment in published briefs supporting the legislative reforms
  • Local Impacts:
    • Lisa Brandl, Managing Director for Riverside County Economic Development Agency
    • Kathy Rosenow, managing partner of RSG community development firm
  • Legal Issues:
    • T. Brent Hawkins, general counsel for the California Redevelopment Association
    • Jennifer Rockwell, Chief Counsel, California Department of Finance
  • Moderator:
    • Stephen Harding, La Verne MPA Program Adjunct Faculty & City Manager, City of Jurupa Valley.

When: 11:15 a.m., Friday, October 28, 2011.

(Deadline to RSVP is Monday, Oct. 24; Please RSVP to paul.hubler@gmail.com)

Cost:     Fees waived for La Verne students, faculty and alumni; ASPA members pay $30 and non-members pay $35.

Where:   DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA  91711.

Contact:  Paul Hubler at (626) 379-4937


October 17, 2011 by University of La Verne

Known across Southern California as the popular sports anchor for KABC-TV’s Eyewitness News Team, Rob Fukuzaki returns to his alma mater on:
Friday, Oct. 28, to serve as keynote speaker for the University of La Verne’s 20th annual Communications Day.

Hosted by the university’s Communications Department, this free event is open to high school and community college students from throughout the region, providing attendees an up-close look at the mass media field. It includes a series of workshop seminars in news writing, photography, graphic design and radio and television production. Each session is conducted by La Verne faculty as well as alumni who are working professionals.

An estimated 275 students from 62 high schools are expected to take part in this year’s activities. Due to limited space reservations are required and can be made by calling the Communications Department at (909) 392-2712.

Highlighting the day’s schedule will be the keynote address by Fukuzaki, who has more than 20 years of professional broadcast experience. The first Japanese-American broadcaster in Los Angeles local news, he has received numerous awards during his time at KABC. While attending La Verne, he was chosen Student Broadcaster of the Year from 1986-1988.

“Robert Fukuzaki is a marquee alumnus, a great example of the type of students we train for head-turning careers. Rob is a leading television sports anchor in Southern California who publicly credits La Verne for setting the foundation for his career,” Communications Department Chair George Keeler said.

This marks Fukuzaki’s second time serving as keynote speaker for Communications Day. Past speakers also include highly respected broadcast journalists Phillip Palmer, Marc Brown, Gayle Anderson and Stan Chambers.

“Students learn from alumni, media celebrities and La Verne professors and take away new skills and fresh inspiration. They also learn the University of La Verne is a premiere first-choice school. We are proud of what we have to offer and are happy to make a difference in the high school arena for the communications leaders of tomorrow,” Keeler said.

Additional information on Communications Day and the University of La Verne Communications Department is available by calling (909) 593-3511-ext. 4291.


October 14, 2011 by University of La Verne

What: The University of La Verne Communications Department is partnering with the Pitzer College Media Studies Program to sponsor a free screening of the 909 Film Festival, which features short films on happenings within that Inland Empire area code.

All films featured were created by filmmakers living within the 909 area code or who made films taking place in those communities. Films highlight creative topics ranging from a documentary on the pig races at the Los Angeles County Fair to a brief history of (the now closed) Santa’s Village in Lake Arrowhead, as well as much more! A total of 18 short films will be shown.

The public is invited and admission is free.

When:  Friday, Oct. 28, 2011, 7 p.m.

Where: University of La Verne Arts and Communications Building, Room 212, 2016 D Street, La Verne

 Contacts: Don Pollock, Professor of Communications, University of La Verne, (909) 593-3511, ext. 4277, dpollock@laverne.edu.

October 14, 2011 by University of La Verne

What:  High school students from neighboring school districts have the chance to submit their entries for the University of La Verne Communication   Department’s third annual My Home Town Film Festival Contest. All entries must be submitted by mail by Friday, January 13, 2012 5 p.m.

To participate, students must submit a DVD of their work and complete an entry form. Entry forms and additional entry requirements are available at www.laverne.edu/lvtv/.

A screening of the best entries will be held in late January in the Arts Communications building on campus. These entries will also be sent to public access TV stations for future screenings across the country. In addition, first, second and third-place winners of the festival will be awarded prizes of video equipment to help support them and their creative works.

When:  Deadline to submit an entry is: Friday, January 13, 2012 5 p.m.

Where:  All DVDs and Entry Forms should be sent to:

My Home Town Video Contest/LVTV-3

1950 Third St.

La Verne, CA 91750

Details: Students from public and private high schools from the following cities are eligible to enter the contest:  Alta Loma, Arcadia, Azusa, Baldwin Park, Chino, Chino Hills, Claremont, Covina, Diamond Bar, Duarte, El Monte, Etiwanda, Fontana, Glendora, Hacienda Heights, La Puente, La Verne, Monrovia, Montclair, Ontario, Pomona, Rancho Cucamonga, Rowland Heights, San Dimas, South El Monte, Upland, Walnut and West Covina.

My Home Town is sponsored by the University of La Verne Communications Department, LVTV-3, La Verne Community Television and KWST, and San Dimas Community Television.

Contacts: Don Pollock, Professor of Communications, University of La Verne,
(909) 593-3511, ext. 4277, dpollock@laverne.edu.

October 13, 2011 by University of La Verne

Talented students interested in pursuing their performance aspirations to the next level are encouraged to apply for one of twelve full tuition scholarships offered through the College of Arts and Sciences.

Performance scholarships include two each in art (painting or sculpture), communications (video production), music (voice or instrument), speech (debate), theatre (performance or design) and photography. Each is renewable annually for up to four years of undergraduate study based upon continuing academic excellence and a major or minor in the performance area of interest.

“These scholarships are designed to attract academically excellent students who have performance abilities that can enhance the community through various art media,” said Jonathan Reed, interim dean, College of Arts and Sciences. “Each also has the potential to change a student’s life.”

According to Reed, study under a performance scholarship involves extracurricular activities that are woven into the academic regimen, such as theatre or musical presentations. As a result, students experience how classroom study is integrated with their various artistic skills.

“Our hope is to elevate the quality of the educational experience for everyone,” Reed said. “The arts showcase La Verne’s entire academic programs, and in fact public performances are, in some ways, the face of the university by virtue of their visibility. La Verne has really developed into a university that more and more potential students are considering because of its excellent program.”

Melanie Nadon is a freshman political science major who anticipates double majoring in her performance area: speech debate. She received a scholarship and this winter will compete in the World Universities Debating Championship in the Philippines and the Oxford Intervarsity Debating Competition.

“The thing that really drew me to La Verne was debate,” she said. “The team goes all over the world, and I really believe that my travels and all that I learn from debating, including knowledge of current events and history, are going to make me more culturally aware and well-rounded.”

Kyle Deeley, a sophomore from Hawaii majoring in communications, said
La Verne’s video production program is “exactly what I wanted.”

“This program is going to give me the skills that I need to be competitive in the job market,” he said. “I can learn without a huge cloud of financial responsibility hanging over my head.”

For additional information, contact the Office of Admission at (800) 876-4858 or visit http://laverne.edu/performance.

October 13, 2011 by University of La Verne

‘One Book, One University’ Encourages Learning Through Shared
Reading, Writing, Discussion

One Book, One University, La Verne’s shared reading program, is off to a fast start, with hundreds of freshmen involved and several high-profile authors and political/social theoreticians participating.

The program, which requires freshmen enrolled in a writing course to read the same assigned book and punctuates that with author lectures and panel discussions, was initiated on campus in 2010-2011. Designed to promote reading and discussion of diverse perspectives while promoting writing as a way of learning, it also serves as a launching point for integrating La Verne’s core values—values orientation, community and diversity, lifelong learning, and community service—into learning.

“One Book, One University exposes freshmen to the university’s values, which are taught throughout their four years here,” said Jonathan Reed, interim dean for the College of Arts and Sciences. “While we want freshmen to read these books, the highlight is bringing authors to campus and holding panel discussions on important topics.”

Reed added, “We want to acculturate students that college is more than just going to class—it involves extracurricular activities and attending lectures and discussions.”

Participation is up sharply from 2010-2011.  Already, several important panel discussions have been held, including Life After 9/11: Personal Accounts of Four Arab Americans; Is the War on Terror Over?; and U.S. Global Strategy in the Wake of 9/11. Moustafa Bayoumi, author of How Does it Feel to Be a Problem, also visited campus to discuss the complexities of being young and Arab in America.

“The two lectures given by Dr. Bayoumi had a very positive effect upon the level of awareness of the University of La Verne community,” student Firas Arodaki said. “Students now can imagine and live with the author whenever they read the book or discuss it.”
Planned during October were two additional presentations: Why is Palestine a Problem: Ignorance and Indifference in Post 9/11 America, and 9/11 and the Politics of Fear: Balancing Liberty and Security at Home and Abroad.

Sean Bernard, associate professor of writing, said the program achieves its stated goals “fantastically.”

“It establishes a community of readers that reaches across dozens of classrooms, giving students a sense of togetherness far more expansive than what they can find in any individual classroom,”” he said. “Add to that the varied and inclusive events that are planned and you suddenly have a cohort of new college students who quickly understand they’re a vital part of a vibrant campus community.”

Cathy Irwin, also an associate professor of writing, said the program creates a campus wide conversation among students, faculty, guest lecturers and panelists.

“To have freshman this involved in university life is exciting for them and helps them to feel a part of our university from the very start,” she said. “Students are sharing their own experiences and having frank discussions.”

October 12, 2011 by academic-affairs

Dr. Christine Broussard, Professor of Biology, and Cristina Zambrano (’11) were awarded an NIH Research Supplement to Promote Diversity In Health-Related Research for the Project entitled, “Prenatal Developmental Immunotoxicity of Diethylstilbestrol and Methoxychlor.”  The $57,346 supplemental grant allows Ms. Zambrano to work as a full-time post-baccalaureate research associate at the University of La Verne for one year.   During the 2011-2012 academic year Ms. Zambrano will examine sex differences in immune system responsiveness to the endocrine disruptors Diethylstilbestrol and Methoxychlor.

October 11, 2011 by academic-affairs

The University of La Verne and LVTV-3, La Verne Community Television, received two first place awards and five finalist awards at the WAVE (Western Area Video Excellence Awards) on October 8 in San Jose. The WAVES honor the best public access TV productions in the Western United States.

The winners:

1) Entertainment/Variety Programming Community Producer
“Party Foul”
Producer: Anthony Troli
Media Center: LVTV-3 La Verne Community Television

2) Public Service Announcement Community Producer
Producers: Daniel Bateman, Marie Tabarez, Kaitlin Hollingsworth
Media Center: LVTV-3 La Verne Community Television

The finalists:

3) Entertainment/Variety Programming Professional
“Morgan Farewell”
Producers: Don Pollock, Mike Laponis, Shane Rodrigues
Media Center: LVTV-3 La Verne Community Television

4) Community Event Professional
“The 2010 San Dimas Western Art Show”
Producer: Christopher Hruby
Media Center: LVTV-3 La Verne Community Television

5) Informational Activities Non-Professional
“Bacon Races”
Producers: Laura Acevedo, Kai Groschupf, Daniella Villegas
Media Center: LVTV-3 La Verne Community Television

6) Documentary Profile Professional
“Leos for Life”
Producers: Don Pollock, Shane Rodrigues,  Mike Laponis
Media Center: LVTV-3 La Verne Community Television

7) Experimental/Innovative Community Producer
Producers: Kaitlin Hollingsworth, Daniel Bateman, Marie Tabarez
Media Center: LVTV-3 La Verne Community Television

The winners and finalists can be viewed on LVTV’s video on demand library at http://www.laverne.edu/lvtv/

October 11, 2011 by academic-affairs

:  La Verne MT (Ryan Mansell and Corey Teter) ranked 1st, and La Verne PA (Thomas Allison and John Patrick) ranked 7th.  Ryan Mansell and Corey Teter advanced to the grand final, where the Loyola Marymount University team won tournament.

The Debate team will compete at the UC Davis tournament and the Oxford IV in November, as well the Hugill Cup, hosted this year by the University of Alberta, Canada. The culmination of these tournaments will occur in December, when 3 teams and 2 judges will compete at the World University Debate Championships in Manila, The Philippines.  The University of La Verne’s Debate program continues to be ranked in the top 20 of BP Debate in the world.


October 10, 2011 by academic-affairs

Dion Johnson, "Glider," 2011, acrylic and Flashe on canvas, 60 x 160 inches


Marty Walker Gallery’s description of Mr. Johnson’s work:  “Bringing California hard edge painting into the new millennium, Johnson combines flat planes of bold commercial colors, creating shifting fields that recall paintings of Karl Benjamin and John McLaughlin.

“The strata of color inspired by LA’s overabundant billboards, architecture and buzzing traffic transforms the congested urban culture into simplified synthetic cityscape of vivid clarity. Johnson, like McLaughlin, explores the movement between the planes of color, like subtle pauses that linger in musical compositions, setting the colors to pulsate between thin stripes and expanding wide slabs, flat space and unexplored depths. While Johnson’s interest is rooted in landscape and environment, his paintings lack any representational forms to evoke an openness recalling an almost utopian eternal Southern California summer – light, rich, and abundant.”