Skip to main content

Office ofReligious and Spiritual Life

Coronavirus: A Call for Compassion

This is a time of great uncertainty, fear and suffering.  It is a time for compassion and commitment to one another. If we are intentional, we can respond to this crisis by calling forth our deepest wisdom, our full compassion. And together, we can help create a more loving and just world.  The Office of Religious and Spiritual Life is committed to helping you stay calm, centered and connected in this challenging and concerning time.  You are not alone. Please refer to the ULV Coronavirus website for comprehensive information and resources, including resources for ULV students.

The Office of Religious and Spiritual Life is here for you – always!
Want to take a breath with us?
Inhale through the nose and Exhale through the mouth.
You got this!

Pastoral Care and Support

Rev. Zandra Wagoner is available for online support and pastoral care via WebEx, FaceTime, Google Hangouts, or Skype.  If you would like to schedule an appointment, please send an email to Rev. Wagoner.

Spiritual Practices for this Challenging Time

Below are helpful practices to keep your spirit and body healthy.

  1. Breathe. Breathe. Breathe some more. Take time in your day, at any  moment, to take ten deep even breaths. Carve out 5-10 minutes to meditate or practice mindfulness or contemplative prayer. Start here, now, wherever you are.
  2. Ground yourself in the present moment. Focus your awareness on something real, enduring, or beautiful in your surroundings. Look up often. Discover the wonder and awe that is already here.
  3. Acknowledge your fears, anxieties, concerns. Offer them up in prayer, if you pray. Write them in your journal. Share them with others. Feel what you feel, honor it, and know that it is not the final word.
  4. Remember you are not alone. Ever. You are surrounded by care and support. Reach out.
  5. Create and sustain community. Show up for one another. Listen compassionately. Practice empathy. Even while avoiding close physical contact, message the people you care about. Stand with those most vulnerable and those who suffer the brunt of prejudice and fear. Check in on folks. Call family and friends.
  6. Unplug, judiciously. While staying aware of developments, do not let the pandemic-chaos govern you, but forgive yourself when and if it does.
  7. Practice kindness. There is a temptation in health scares to view others as potential threats. Remember we are in this together. While practicing health guidelines and appropriate caution, remember to engage one another. Smile when you can. Bring good deeds and good energy into our world.
  8. Stay healthy through sleep, diet, exercise. See healing and wellness holistically – mind, body, and spirit.
  9. Create art. Discover, imagine, engage your hopes and fears, the beauty and ugliness of our world. Write, paint, sing, dance, soar.
  10. Practice gratitude. In the face of crises, make note of the things for which you are grateful: your breath, the particular shade of the sky at dusk – or dawn. The color blue, the color green, the gifts and strengths you have, other people in your life, the ability to laugh. A pet.
  11. Connect with your spiritual, religious, humanist, cultural, or other communities. Find strength and solace and power in traditions, texts, rituals, practices, holy times and seasons.
  12. Pray as you are able, silently, through song, in readings, through ancestors. Remember the long view of history, the rhythms and cycles of nature, the invisible threads that connect us all.
  13. Practice hope. Trust in the future and our power to endure and persist, to live fully into the goodness that awaits.

Shared with permission from Northeastern University, Center for Spirituality, Dialogue, and Service (CSDS). Contact Rev. Dr. Zandra Wagoner, University of La Verne Chaplain if you need assistance.  She can be reached at zwagoner@laverne.edu or 909-448-4448. 

Saturday, March 21, 2020